Today Apple announced the iPhone 7. I’ve been waiting for this day for as long as I can remember. In preparation for the event I read every juicy rumor, sifted through all the speculation, and found myself immersed in the next phase of Apple’s most iconic product.

It was 12:57pm ET and I was sitting down with my lunch to take in the wonder of what I thought would be the most anticipated Apple Event in years. And then the unthinkable happened. Apple snitched on itself.

The iPhone 7 was announced before Cook uttered a word

By now you’ve likely heard that the most secretive company in the world accidentally tweeted out new features and a video of the iPhone 7 a few minutes before Tim Cook took the stage at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco. Talk about bad timing. Not to mention their archrival bent them over the barrel 15 minutes before the Cook-note started.

“But then I let myself feel something that has been building inside of me since 2007 when Apple announced the first iPhone. I realized that it didn’t matter anymore.”

This doesn’t happen. Ever. The Apple faithful didn’t know whether to jump for joy or weep in a corner. All the build up and anticipation of the event ruined by a mere 140 characters.

At first I was pretty upset. I mean, I knew what features were coming so I guess it wasn’t that bad. But then I let go. I let myself feel something that has been building inside of me since 2007 when Apple announced the first iPhone. I realized that it didn’t matter anymore. And that realization was further reinforced when I read Molly McHugh’s article. She sums up everything I’ve been thinking about Apple’s events and keynotes over the past few years.

Let’s face it — we live in a world where information becomes available faster than we can digest it. We know the amazing, life-changing, “can’t live without it” features before they’re formally announced. And, for better or worse, that’s the way of the world now.

But I still look back and dream of better days. The original iPhone announcement in 2007 was the most magical thing I had ever seen. Steve Jobs gave us the device that would change the way we interact with each other and the world. Those days are long gone unless someone changes the game and sparks another revolution. I’m looking at you Apple Car.